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Table 3 Responses from natural resource professionals in the Southeaster Coastal Plain of the United States (2015 to 2016) when asked, “how have RCW management practices change throughout your career?” (Additional file 1: question 18). Some interviewees gave more than one response

From: Aligning endangered species management with fire-dependent ecosystem restoration: manager perspectives on red-cockaded woodpecker and longleaf pine management actions

  Experience working with red-cockaded woodpeckers
Response 0-5 yr 6-10 yr 11-15 yr 16-20 yr 21-25 yr >26 yr Total (n)
1. Managing whole ecosystems rather than individual components 1 3 1   3 1 9
2. Innovations in technology (e.g., peeper cameras, development of artificial cavities) 1 1 2 1 3 1 9
3. Agency attitude towards RCW management now more positive 1   4    3 8
4. No change during their career 4   4     8
5. More prescribed fire   1   1 3 1 6
6. Translocation program has grown or improved    1   1 1 3
7. Greater knowledge of habitat needs   1 1   1   3
8. Increase in wildland-urban interface concerns      1   1
9. More inter-agency collaboration       1 1
10. Less demand for translocated birds 1       1
11. More staff resources devoted to RCW management activities       1 1
Total participants by experience 5 6 7 2 6 6 32