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Table 1 Data sources for explanatory and response variables, the source, and the scale at which they were collected in the Illilouette Creek basin in Yosemite National Park and Sugarloaf Valley in Kings Canyon National Park, California, USA. Public data were collected from early 1900s. Study data were collected from 2002 to 2013. Field data were collected from 2002 to 2013 to observe naturally occurring patterns of forest and understory structure and composition in relationship to fire regime

From: Drivers of understory plant communities in Sierra Nevada mixed conifer forests with pyrodiversity

Variables Source Resolution
Understory community response variables
 Percent cover Point-intercept of understory 0 to 2 m2 and timed area search 490 m2
 Richness Timed-area search 490 m2
 Evenness Point-intercept of understory 0 to 2 m2 and timed area search 490 m2
 Simpson’s diversity Point-intercept of understory 0 to 2 m2 and timed area search 490 m2
Explanatory variables
 Fire Time since fire Sequoia-Kings National Park 2012; Yosemite National Park 2012 Varieda
Fire severity Miller and Thode 2007 30 m2
Number of times burned Miller and Thode 2007 30 m2
Pyrodiversity Miller and Thode, Sequoia-Kings National Park 2012; Yosemite National Park 2012 30 m2
 Environmental Shrub cover Point-intercept of shrubs 0.5 to 2 m2 490 m2
Percent slope Clinometer 490 m2
Canopy cover GRS tube densitometer 490 m2
Soil texture Thien 1979 490 m2
Litter depth Average of six measurements 490 m2
Elevation USGS Digital Elevation Model from Gesch 2007 10 m2
Solar radiation Derived from USGS Digital Elevation Model following McCune and Keon 2002 100 m2
Climatic water deficit Flint et al. 2014 270 m2
  1. aTime since fire is “varied” since the records go back to early 1900s. Excerpt from metadata: “This coverage represents the YOSE fire history from 1930 through 2018. Original data was interpreted from historical fire records held at Yosemite National Park in the late 1980s. GRASS data was converted to Arc/Info coverage format when Yosemite migrated to Arc/Info in 1995. Some vector data was lost in conversion from GRASS. In those instances, polygons were vectorized from raster versions that remained in GRASS. Each year from 1995 to 2000, fires were input into Arc/Info by digitizing 1:24,000 USGS paper maps (7.5″ series) or from Trimble GPS readings. Starting 2001, all larger fire perimeters were acquired through ground GPS or helicopter GPS reconnaissance. Small fire point locations were acquired through ground GPS or helicopter GPS and buffered to approximate fire size”