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  1. The LANDFIRE Program provides comprehensive vegetation and fuel datasets for the entire United States. As with many large-scale ecological datasets, vegetation and landscape conditions must be updated periodic...

    Authors: Kurtis J. Nelson, Joel Connot, Birgit Peterson and Charley Martin

    Citation: Fire Ecology 2013 9:9020080

    Content type: Research Article

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  2. While fire is widely recognized as an important factor shaping sagebrush (Artemisia spp.) ecosystems, little is known about the role other natural events play in these systems. Using a state-and-transition modeli...

    Authors: Louisa B. Evers, Richard F. Miller and Paul S. Doescher

    Citation: Fire Ecology 2013 9:9020057

    Content type: Research Article

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  3. Forest fires contribute a significant amount of CO2 to the atmosphere each year, and CO2 emissions from fires are likely to increase under projected conditions of global climate change. In addition to volatilizin...

    Authors: Katherine Heckman, John Campbell, Heath Powers, Beverly Law and Chris Swanston

    Citation: Fire Ecology 2013 9:9020040

    Content type: Research Article

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  4. As the large scale of fuel treatments needed to promote ecosystem health and reduce heavy fuel loads becomes clear in California’s mixed conifer forests, managers are beginning to focus on how to scale up pres...

    Authors: Rick J. Sneeuwjagt, Tim S. Kline and Scott L. Stephens

    Citation: Fire Ecology 2013 9:9020014

    Content type: Forum: Issues, Management, Policy, and Opinions

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  5. The ability to document the frequency, extent, and severity of fires in wetlands, as well as the dynamics of post-fire wetland land cover, informs fire and wetland science, resource management, and ecosystem p...

    Authors: John W. Jones, Annette E. Hall, Ann M. Foster and Thomas J. Smith III

    Citation: Fire Ecology 2013 9:9010133

    Content type: Research Article

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  6. Ecotones are areas of sharp environmental gradients between two or more homogeneous vegetation types. They are a dynamic aspect of all landscapes and are also responsive to climate change. Shifts in the positi...

    Authors: Thomas J. Smith III, Ann M. Foster, Ginger Tiling-Range and John W. Jones

    Citation: Fire Ecology 2013 9:9010066

    Content type: Research Article

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  7. Canebrakes are monodominant stands of cane (Arundinaria gigantea [Walter] Muhl.), a bamboo native to and once prominent in the southeastern USA. Canebrakes were important wildlife habitat within the bottomland ha...

    Authors: Paul R. Gagnon, Heather A. Passmore and William J. Platt

    Citation: Fire Ecology 2013 9:9010055

    Content type: Research Article

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  8. Within the marl prairie grasslands of the Florida Everglades, USA, the combined effects of fire and flooding usually lead to very significant changes in tree island structure and composition. Depending on fire...

    Authors: Pablo L. Ruiz, Jay P. Sah, Michael S. Ross and Adam A. Spitzig

    Citation: Fire Ecology 2013 9:9010038

    Content type: Research Article

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  9. Fire is a major determinant of the global carbon (C) balance. While it is known that C is lost through organic matter combustion, the effect fire has on soil C biogeochemistry is unclear. Studies investigating...

    Authors: Cassandra A. Medvedeff, Kanika S. Inglett, Leda N. Kobziar and Patrick W. Inglett

    Citation: Fire Ecology 2013 9:9010021

    Content type: Research Article

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  10. Aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) comprises only a small fraction (1 %) of the Sierra Nevada landscape, yet contributes significant biological diversity to this range. In an effort to rejuvenate declining aspen ...

    Authors: Kevin D. Krasnow, Anne S. Halford and Scott L. Stephens

    Citation: Fire Ecology 2012 8:8030104

    Content type: Research Article

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  11. An isolated population of bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis nelsoni) occupies fire-adapted chaparral ranges in the San Gabriel Mountains, California, USA. During 1976 to 2006, the amount of high-suitability habitat ...

    Authors: Stephen A. Holl, Vernon C. Bleich, Barry W. Callenberger and Bernard Bahro

    Citation: Fire Ecology 2012 8:8030088

    Content type: Research Article

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  12. We investigated the physical and burning characteristics of sugar pine (Pinus lambertiana Douglas) cones and their contribution to woody surface fuel loadings. Field sampling was conducted at the Yosemite Forest ...

    Authors: Anton T. Gabrielson, Andrew J. Larson, James A. Lutz and James J. Reardon

    Citation: Fire Ecology 2012 8:8030058

    Content type: Research Article

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  13. Prevalence of parasites can be an indicator of individual and population health of hosts. Populations of parasites can be affected by habitat management practices, however, which in turn can affect prevalence ...

    Authors: Earl D. McCoy, Joseph M. Styga, Carol E. Rizkalla and Henry R. Mushinsky

    Citation: Fire Ecology 2012 8:8030032

    Content type: Research Article

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  14. Standing dead trees, or snags, are an important habitat element for many animal species. In many ecosystems, fire is a primary driver of snag population dynamics because it can both create and consume snags. T...

    Authors: John D. Lloyd, Gary L. Slater and James R. Snyder

    Citation: Fire Ecology 2012 8:8030018

    Content type: Research Article

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  15. Exotic grasses capable of increasing frequency and intensity of anthropogenic fire have invaded subtropical and tropical dry forests worldwide. Since many dry forest trees are susceptible to fire, this can res...

    Authors: Jarrod M. Thaxton, Skip J. Van Bloem and Stefanie Whitmire

    Citation: Fire Ecology 2012 8:8030009

    Content type: Research Article

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  16. In 2002, the Williams Fire burned >90 % of the San Dimas Experimental Forest, providing an opportunity to investigate differences in soil water repellency, peak discharge, and sediment yield between grass-conv...

    Authors: Ken R. Hubbert, Pete M. Wohlgemuth, Jan L. Beyers, Marcia G. Narog and Ross Gerrard

    Citation: Fire Ecology 2012 8:8020143

    Content type: Research Article

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  17. An important objective for many federal land management agencies is to restore fire to ecosystems that have experienced fire suppression or exclusion over the last century. Managing wildfires for resource obje...

    Authors: Joe H. Scott, Donald J. Helmbrecht, Sean A. Parks and Carol Miller

    Citation: Fire Ecology 2012 8:8020125

    Content type: Research Article

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  18. Fire-prone serotinous California Hesperocyparis L. (cypress) have been experiencing low seedling recruitment, underscoring our need to better understand these species’ responses to fire. We investigated the speci...

    Authors: Kate L. Milich, John D. Stuart, J. Morgan Varner III and Kyle E. Merriam

    Citation: Fire Ecology 2012 8:8020107

    Content type: Research Article

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  19. Wildland managers need detailed information about the responses of invasive species to fire and the conditions that increase site invasibility in order to effectively manage fire without introducing or increas...

    Authors: Corey L. Gucker, Kris Zouhar, Jane Kapler Smith and Katharine R. Stone

    Citation: Fire Ecology 2012 8:8020057

    Content type: Research Article

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  20. During 2008, under a region-wide drought, there were a large number of simultaneous fires in the Paraná River Delta region: the most affected vegetation was in marshes dominated by Schoenoplectus californicus (C....

    Authors: Mercedes Salvia, Darío Ceballos, Francisco Grings, Haydee Karszenbaum and Patricia Kandus

    Citation: Fire Ecology 2012 8:8020017

    Content type: Research Article

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  21. Understory shrubs play important ecological roles in forests of the western US, but they can also impede early tree growth and lead to fire hazard concerns when very dense. Some of the more common genera (Ceanoth...

    Authors: Eric E. Knapp, C. Phillip Weatherspoon and Carl N. Skinner

    Citation: Fire Ecology 2012 8:8010032

    Content type: Research Article

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