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  1. In 2002, the Williams Fire burned >90 % of the San Dimas Experimental Forest, providing an opportunity to investigate differences in soil water repellency, peak discharge, and sediment yield between grass-conv...

    Authors: Ken R. Hubbert, Pete M. Wohlgemuth, Jan L. Beyers, Marcia G. Narog and Ross Gerrard
    Citation: Fire Ecology 2012 8:8020143
  2. An important objective for many federal land management agencies is to restore fire to ecosystems that have experienced fire suppression or exclusion over the last century. Managing wildfires for resource obje...

    Authors: Joe H. Scott, Donald J. Helmbrecht, Sean A. Parks and Carol Miller
    Citation: Fire Ecology 2012 8:8020125
  3. Fire-prone serotinous California Hesperocyparis L. (cypress) have been experiencing low seedling recruitment, underscoring our need to better understand these species’ responses to fire. We investigated the speci...

    Authors: Kate L. Milich, John D. Stuart, J. Morgan Varner III and Kyle E. Merriam
    Citation: Fire Ecology 2012 8:8020107
  4. Wildland managers need detailed information about the responses of invasive species to fire and the conditions that increase site invasibility in order to effectively manage fire without introducing or increas...

    Authors: Corey L. Gucker, Kris Zouhar, Jane Kapler Smith and Katharine R. Stone
    Citation: Fire Ecology 2012 8:8020057
  5. During 2008, under a region-wide drought, there were a large number of simultaneous fires in the Paraná River Delta region: the most affected vegetation was in marshes dominated by Schoenoplectus californicus (C....

    Authors: Mercedes Salvia, Darío Ceballos, Francisco Grings, Haydee Karszenbaum and Patricia Kandus
    Citation: Fire Ecology 2012 8:8020017
  6. Understory shrubs play important ecological roles in forests of the western US, but they can also impede early tree growth and lead to fire hazard concerns when very dense. Some of the more common genera (Ceanoth...

    Authors: Eric E. Knapp, C. Phillip Weatherspoon and Carl N. Skinner
    Citation: Fire Ecology 2012 8:8010032
  7. Prescribed and resource benefit fires are used to manage fuels in fire-prone landscapes in the Southwest. These practices, however, typically occur under different conditions, potentially leading to difference...

    Authors: Molly E. Hunter, Jose M. Iniguez and Leigh B. Lentile
    Citation: Fire Ecology 2011 7:7030108
  8. The recent occurrence of large fires with a substantial stand-replacing component in the southwestern United States (e.g., Cerro Grande, 2000; Rodeo-Chedeski, 2002; Aspen, 2003; Horseshoe 2, Las Conchas, and W...

    Authors: Ellis Q. Margolis, Thomas W. Swetnam and Craig D. Allen
    Citation: Fire Ecology 2011 7:7030088
  9. We studied the long-term response of a cohort of eight female Agassiz’s desert tortoises (Gopherus agassizii) during the first 15 years following a large fire at a wind energy generation facility near Palm Spring...

    Authors: Jeffrey E. Lovich, Joshua R. Ennen, Sheila V. Madrak, Caleb L. Loughran, Katherin P. Meyer, Terence R. Arundel and Curtis D. Bjurlin
    Citation: Fire Ecology 2011 7:7030075
  10. We examined non-native species density three years after the Tuolumne Fire, which burned 1540 ha in upper montane forest in California, USA. We sampled 60 plots, stratified by burn severity (low, moderate, or ...

    Authors: Kristen M. Kaczynski, Susan W. Beatty, Jan W. van Wagtendonk and Kristin N. Marshall
    Citation: Fire Ecology 2011 7:7020145
  11. Remotely sensed imagery has been used extensively in the western US to evaluate patterns of burn severity and vegetation recovery following wildland fires. Its application in southern US ecosystems, however, h...

    Authors: David R. Godwin and Leda N. Kobziar
    Citation: Fire Ecology 2011 7:7020099
  12. We surveyed burned and unburned plots across four habitat reserves in San Diego County, California, USA, in 2005 and 2006, to assess the effects of the 2003 wildfires on the community structure and relative ab...

    Authors: Cheryl S. Brehme, Denise R. Clark, Carlton J. Rochester and Robert N. Fisher
    Citation: Fire Ecology 2011 7:7020081
  13. Fire frequency, area burned, and fire severity are important attributes of a fire regime, but few studies have quantified the interrelationships among them in evaluating a fire year. Although area burned is of...

    Authors: James A. Lutz, Carl H. Key, Crystal A. Kolden, Jonathan T. Kane and Jan W. van Wagtendonk
    Citation: Fire Ecology 2011 7:7020051
  14. The role of fire in the maintenance of oak-dominated ecosystems is widely recognized. Fire exclusion results in structural and compositional shifts that alter fuelbed composition and structure, together influe...

    Authors: Eamon A. Engber, J. Morgan Varner III, Leonel A. Arguello and Neil G. Sugihara
    Citation: Fire Ecology 2011 7:7020032
  15. The soil seed bank plays a central role in the regeneration of obligate seeding species in fire-prone habitats. We evaluated how seed density and species composition changed with time-since-fire in the Florida...

    Authors: Jennifer J. Navarra, Nancy Kohfeldt, Eric S. Menges and Pedro F. Quintana-Ascencio
    Citation: Fire Ecology 2011 7:7020017
  16. This paper is an expansion of the thoughts I presented in the closing plenary at the 4th International Fire Ecology and Management Conference in Savannah, Georgia, USA. After ruminating over several days of oral ...

    Authors: Dale D. Wade
    Citation: Fire Ecology 2011 7:7010107
  17. Currently, high intensity, large-area lightning fires that burn during droughts dominate Canada’s fire regimes. However, studies from several disciplines clearly show that humans historically ignited burns wit...

    Authors: Clifford A. White, Daniel D. B. Perrakis, Victor G. Kafka and Timothy Ennis
    Citation: Fire Ecology 2011 7:7010074
  18. Africa is often referred to as the Fire Continent, and fire is recognised as a natural factor of the environment due to the prevalence of lightning storms and an ideal fire climate in the less arid regions wit...

    Authors: Winston S. W. Trollope
    Citation: Fire Ecology 2011 7:7010057
  19. Traditionally, forest fires in Mexico, the Caribe, and Central America have been perceived, by both urban and some rural societies and government agencies, only as destructive phenomena. Certainly 40% of fores...

    Authors: Dante Arturo Rodríguez-Trejo, Pedro Arturo Martínez-Hernández, Héctor Ortiz-Contla, Manuel Román Chavarría-Sánchez and Faustino Hernández-Santiago
    Citation: Fire Ecology 2011 7:7010040
  20. We define pyrogeography as an integrative, multidisciplinary perspective of landscape fire, its ecological effects, and its relationships with human societies. Like biogeography, this program spans geographic ...

    Authors: David M. J. S. Bowman and Brett P. Murphy
    Citation: Fire Ecology 2011 7:7010005

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