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  1. Shrubs contribute to the forest fuel load; their distribution is important to tree mortality and regeneration, and vertebrate occupancy. We used a method new to fire ecology—extensive continuous mapping of tre...

    Authors: James A. Lutz, Tucker J. Furniss, Sara J. Germain, Kendall M. L. Becker, Erika M. Blomdahl, Sean M. A. Jeronimo, C. Alina Cansler, James A. Freund, Mark E. Swanson and Andrew J. Larson

    Citation: Fire Ecology 2017 13:13010104

    Content type: Research Article

    Published on:

  2. Historically, oak woodlands in western North America were maintained by frequent fire that killed competing conifers. Today, these woodlands are often in decline as competition from conifers intensifies. Among...

    Authors: Ethan J. Hammett, Martin W. Ritchie and John-Pascal Berrill

    Citation: Fire Ecology 2017 13:13010091

    Content type: Research Article

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  3. Fire was the dominant ecological process controlling forest structure and succession in western North American conifer forests for thousands of years. Because fires are now suppressed, and because widespread l...

    Authors: Jay D. Miller and Hugh D. Safford

    Citation: Fire Ecology 2017 13:13010058

    Content type: Research Article

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  4. We examined stand structure, demography, and fire history using tree cores and fire scar data across an approximately 7000-hectare study area over an elevational gradient in the southern Cascade Range, Oregon,...

    Authors: Alison B. Forrestel, Robert A. Andrus, Danny L. Fry and Scott L. Stephens

    Citation: Fire Ecology 2017 13:13010001

    Content type: Research Article

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  5. There is considerable interest in evaluating whether recent wildfires in dry conifer forests of western North America are burning with uncharacteristic severity—that is, with a severity outside the historical ...

    Authors: Paula J. Fornwalt, Laurie S. Huckaby, Steven K. Alton, Merrill R. Kaufmann, Peter M. Brown and Antony S. Cheng

    Citation: Fire Ecology 2016 12:12030117

    Content type: Research Article

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  6. Fire severity maps are an important tool for understanding fire effects on a landscape. The relative differenced normalized burn ratio (RdNBR) is a commonly used severity index in California forests, and is ty...

    Authors: Jamie M. Lydersen, Brandon M. Collins, Jay D. Miller, Danny L. Fry and Scott L. Stephens

    Citation: Fire Ecology 2016 12:12030099

    Content type: Research Article

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  7. Monitoring landscape-scale vegetation responses of resprouter species to wildfire is helpful in explaining post-wildfire recovery. Several previous Australian studies have investigated the temporal recovery of...

    Authors: Jessica T. Heath, Chris J. Chafer, Thomas F. A. Bishop and Floris F. Van Ogtrop

    Citation: Fire Ecology 2016 12:12030053

    Content type: Research Article

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  8. Fire is critical to the maintenance of ecological function in many ecosystems worldwide, especially mesic sub-Saharan rangelands. But most rangeland fire research occurs in a wildfire context, is focused on fi...

    Authors: Devan Allen McGranahan, Rerani Ramaano, Michelle J. Tedder and Kevin P. Kirkman

    Citation: Fire Ecology 2016 12:12030040

    Content type: Research Article

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  9. Prescribed burns and wildfires maintain prairie vegetation by limiting tree growth and promoting prairie grasses and forb production. Previous studies have shown that fire causes mixed effects on the prairie f...

    Authors: Eric G. Bright, Mohsain Gill, Ashtyn Barrientes and Elizabeth A. Bergey

    Citation: Fire Ecology 2016 12:12030026

    Content type: Research Article

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  10. Fire is being prescribed and used increasingly to promote ecosystem restoration (e.g., oak woodlands and savannas) and to manage wildlife habitat in the Central Hardwoods and Appalachian regions, USA. However,...

    Authors: Craig A. Harper, W. Mark Ford, Marcus A. Lashley, Christopher E. Moorman and Michael C. Stambaugh

    Citation: Fire Ecology 2016 12:12020127

    Content type: Review Article

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  11. Characterization of scale dependence of fire intervals could inform interpretations of fire history and improve fire prescriptions that aim to mimic historical fire regime conditions. We quantified the tempora...

    Authors: Michael C. Stambaugh, Richard P. Guyette, Joseph M. Marschall and Daniel C. Dey

    Citation: Fire Ecology 2016 12:12020065

    Content type: Research Article

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  12. Fire is integral to the functioning of terrestrial ecosystems of the southeastern USA and is a strong selective force on plant species. Among woody plants, oak species (Quercus spp. L) have diverse life history t...

    Authors: J. Morgan Varner, Jeffrey M. Kane, J. Kevin Hiers, Jesse K. Kreye and Joseph W. Veldman

    Citation: Fire Ecology 2016 12:12020048

    Content type: Research Article

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  13. Fire and resource managers of the southern Appalachian Mountains, USA, have many questions about the use of prescribed fire and mechanical treatments to meet various land management objectives. Three common ob...

    Authors: Thomas A. Waldrop, Donald L. Hagan and Dean M. Simon

    Citation: Fire Ecology 2016 12:12020028

    Content type: Research Article

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  14. The northern long-eared bat (Myotis septentrionalis Trovessart) is a cavity-roosting species that forages in cluttered upland and riparian forests throughout the oak-dominated Appalachian and Central Hardwoods re...

    Authors: W. Mark Ford, Alexander Silvis, Joshua B. Johnson, John W. Edwards and Milu Karp

    Citation: Fire Ecology 2016 12:12020013

    Content type: Research Article

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  15. This special issue of Fire Ecology is focused on the fire ecology of eastern USA oak (Quercus L.) forests, woodlands, and savannas. The papers were presented as part of the Fifth Fire in Eastern Oak Forests Confe...

    Authors: J. Morgan Varner, Mary A. Arthur, Stacy L. Clark, Daniel C. Dey, Justin L. Hart and Callie J. Schweitzer

    Citation: Fire Ecology 2016 12:12020001

    Content type: Special Issue Introduction

    Published on:

  16. The Interagency Fuels Treatment Decision Support System (IFTDSS) is a web-based software and data integration framework that organizes fire and fuels software applications into a single online application. IFT...

    Authors: Stacy A. Drury, H. Michael Rauscher, Erin M. Banwell, ShihMing Huang and Tami L. Lavezzo

    Citation: Fire Ecology 2016 12:12010103

    Content type: Forum: Issues, Management, Policy, and Opinions

    Published on:

  17. Yellow pine (Pinus spp. L.) and mixed conifer (YPMC) forests of California, USA (Alta California), have been negatively affected since Euro-American settlement by a century or more of logging, fire exclusion, and...

    Authors: Hiram Rivera-Huerta, Hugh D. Safford and Jay D. Miller

    Citation: Fire Ecology 2016 12:12010052

    Content type: Research Article

    Published on:

  18. The interactions between climate and wildland fire are complex. To better understand these interactions, we used ArcMap 10.2.2 to examine the relationships between early spring snowmelt and total annual area b...

    Authors: Donal S. O’Leary III, Trevor D. Bloom, Jacob C. Smith, Christopher R. Zemp and Michael J. Medler

    Citation: Fire Ecology 2016 12:12010041

    Content type: Research Article

    Published on:

  19. Prescribed fire is a primary tool used to restore western forests following more than a century of fire exclusion, reducing fire hazard by removing dead and live fuels (small trees and shrubs). It is commonly ...

    Authors: Phillip J. van Mantgem, Anthony C. Caprio, Nathan L. Stephenson and Adrian J. Das

    Citation: Fire Ecology 2016 12:12010013

    Content type: Research Article

    Published on:

  20. The use of fire as a land management tool is well recognized for its ecological benefits in many natural systems. To continue to use fire while complying with air quality regulations, land managers are often t...

    Authors: Josh Hyde, Eva K. Strand, Andrew T. Hudak and Dale Hamilton

    Citation: Fire Ecology 2015 11:11030108

    Content type: Research Article

    Published on:

    The Correction to this article has been published in Fire Ecology 2019 15:23

  21. A legacy of past fires is evident in the form of blackened basal hollows found throughout the southern range of the coast redwood (Sequoia sempervirens [D. Don] Endl.) forest. A deeper look reveals cambial scars ...

    Authors: Gregory A. Jones and Will Russell

    Citation: Fire Ecology 2015 11:11030080

    Content type: Research Article

    Published on:

  22. Prescribed fire is commonly used to restore and maintain the longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.) ecosystem (LLPE). A key function of the LLPE is the provisioning of food for wildlife. Despite the plethora of li...

    Authors: Marcus A. Lashley, M. Colter Chitwood, Craig A. Harper, Christopher S. DePerno and Christopher E. Moorman

    Citation: Fire Ecology 2015 11:11030062

    Content type: Research Article

    Published on:

  23. Fire severity can increase above historical levels due to factors such as human-derived fire suppression and climate change. Studies about the effects of high-severity fires on soil carbon and nutrients in pin...

    Authors: Shatya D. Quintero-Gradilla, Felipe García-Oliva, Ramón Cuevas-Guzmán, Enrique J. Jardel-Peláez and Angelina Martínez-Yrizar

    Citation: Fire Ecology 2015 11:11030045

    Content type: Research Article

    Published on:

  24. Small-scale fire approaches, like burn boxes, burn tables, and propane burners, are often used to facilitate experimental control over fire and allow greater replication. We compared characteristics of grassla...

    Authors: Katherine C. Kral, Ryan F. Limb, Torre J. Hovick, Devan A. McGranahan, Aaron L. Field and Peter L. O’Brien

    Citation: Fire Ecology 2015 11:11030034

    Content type: Research Article

    Published on:

  25. The effects of prescribed burning and thinning on lichen communities is a poorly understood aspect of biodiversity conservation, despite the widespread use of these practices to achieve conservation-oriented l...

    Authors: David G. Ray, Jason W. Barton and James C. Lendemer

    Citation: Fire Ecology 2015 11:11030014

    Content type: Research Article

    Published on:

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