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  1. The use of fire as a land management tool is well recognized for its ecological benefits in many natural systems. To continue to use fire while complying with air quality regulations, land managers are often t...

    Authors: Josh Hyde, Eva K. Strand, Andrew T. Hudak and Dale Hamilton

    Citation: Fire Ecology 2015 11:11030108

    Content type: Research Article

    Published on:

    The Correction to this article has been published in Fire Ecology 2019 15:23

  2. A legacy of past fires is evident in the form of blackened basal hollows found throughout the southern range of the coast redwood (Sequoia sempervirens [D. Don] Endl.) forest. A deeper look reveals cambial scars ...

    Authors: Gregory A. Jones and Will Russell

    Citation: Fire Ecology 2015 11:11030080

    Content type: Research Article

    Published on:

  3. Prescribed fire is commonly used to restore and maintain the longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.) ecosystem (LLPE). A key function of the LLPE is the provisioning of food for wildlife. Despite the plethora of li...

    Authors: Marcus A. Lashley, M. Colter Chitwood, Craig A. Harper, Christopher S. DePerno and Christopher E. Moorman

    Citation: Fire Ecology 2015 11:11030062

    Content type: Research Article

    Published on:

  4. Fire severity can increase above historical levels due to factors such as human-derived fire suppression and climate change. Studies about the effects of high-severity fires on soil carbon and nutrients in pin...

    Authors: Shatya D. Quintero-Gradilla, Felipe García-Oliva, Ramón Cuevas-Guzmán, Enrique J. Jardel-Peláez and Angelina Martínez-Yrizar

    Citation: Fire Ecology 2015 11:11030045

    Content type: Research Article

    Published on:

  5. Small-scale fire approaches, like burn boxes, burn tables, and propane burners, are often used to facilitate experimental control over fire and allow greater replication. We compared characteristics of grassla...

    Authors: Katherine C. Kral, Ryan F. Limb, Torre J. Hovick, Devan A. McGranahan, Aaron L. Field and Peter L. O’Brien

    Citation: Fire Ecology 2015 11:11030034

    Content type: Research Article

    Published on:

  6. The effects of prescribed burning and thinning on lichen communities is a poorly understood aspect of biodiversity conservation, despite the widespread use of these practices to achieve conservation-oriented l...

    Authors: David G. Ray, Jason W. Barton and James C. Lendemer

    Citation: Fire Ecology 2015 11:11030014

    Content type: Research Article

    Published on:

  7. Thinning of conifers followed by pile burning has become a popular treatment to reduce fuel loads in the Lake Tahoe Basin, USA. However, concern has been voiced about burning within or near riparian areas beca...

    Authors: Ken R. Hubbert, Matt Busse, Steve Overby, Carol Shestak and Ross Gerrard

    Citation: Fire Ecology 2015 11:11020100

    Content type: Research Article

    Published on:

  8. Federal fire management plans are essential implementation guides for the management of wildland fire on federal lands. Recent changes in federal fire policy implementation guidance and fire science informatio...

    Authors: Marc D. Meyer, Susan L. Roberts, Robin Wills, Matthew Brooks and Eric M. Winford

    Citation: Fire Ecology 2015 11:11020059

    Content type: Research Article

    Published on:

  9. As the size and extent of wildfires has increased in recent decades, so has the cost and extent of post-fire management, including seeding and salvage logging. However, we know little about how burn severity, ...

    Authors: Penelope Morgan, Marshell Moy, Christine A. Droske, Sarah A. Lewis, Leigh B. Lentile, Peter R. Robichaud, Andrew T. Hudak and Christopher J. Williams

    Citation: Fire Ecology 2015 11:11020031

    Content type: Research Article

    Published on:

  10. Forest fires generate large amounts of ash and biochar, or black carbon (BC), that cover the soil surface, interacting with the soil’s constituents and its seedbank. This study concerns reproductive ecology as...

    Authors: Otilia Reyes, Joeri Kaal, Diego Arán, Raquel Gago, Javier Bernal, Juan García-Duro and Margarita Basanta

    Citation: Fire Ecology 2015 11:11010119

    Content type: Research Article

    Published on:

  11. Acquiring experiential prescribed fire education is difficult for college students. In order to evaluate the effects of instruction on students, we surveyed those who were taking or had completed Oklahoma Stat...

    Authors: J. Derek Scasta, John R. Weir and David M. Engle

    Citation: Fire Ecology 2015 11:11010088

    Content type: Research Article

    Published on:

  12. The probability of stem survival after fire is strongly influenced by energy allocation to bark because bark thickness affects heat transfer during fire. Greater relative investment in inner bark versus outer ...

    Authors: Jennifer L. Schafer, Bradley P. Breslow, Matthew G. Hohmann and William A. Hoffmann

    Citation: Fire Ecology 2015 11:11010074

    Content type: Research Article

    Published on:

  13. Forest wildfires are recognized as sources of CO2 and other greenhouse gases (GHG) that, altering the dynamics between terrestrial and atmospheric carbon (C) exchange, influence global climate. In central Andean ...

    Authors: Maria Lila Bertolin, Maria Florencia Urretavizcaya and Guillermo Emilio Defossé

    Citation: Fire Ecology 2015 11:11010032

    Content type: Research Article

    Published on:

  14. Understanding fine-scale fire patchiness has significant implications for ecological processes and biodiversity conservation. It can affect local extinction of and recolonisation by relatively immobile fauna a...

    Authors: Sofia L. J. Oliveira, Manuel L. Campagnolo, Owen F. Price, Andrew C. Edwards, Jeremy Russell-Smith and José M. C. Pereira

    Citation: Fire Ecology 2015 11:11010010

    Content type: Research Article

    Published on:

  15. Together with other stressors, interactions between fire and climate change are expressing their potential to drive ecosystem shifts and losses in biodiversity. Closely linked to human well-being in most regio...

    Authors: Mary R. Huffman

    Citation: Fire Ecology 2014 10:10030090

    Content type: Forum: Issues, Management, Policy, and Opinions

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  16. Synthesis of multiple sources of fire history information increases the power and reliability of fire regime characterization. Fire regime characterization is critical for assessing fire risk, identifying clim...

    Authors: Michael C. Stambaugh, Jeffrey C. Sparks and E. R. Abadir

    Citation: Fire Ecology 2014 10:10030072

    Content type: Research Article

    Published on:

  17. Seeding of native grasses is widely used to restore plant communities and prevent establishment of introduced species following wildfire and prescribed burns. However, there is a lack of long-term data to eval...

    Authors: Laura M. Busby and Darlene Southworth

    Citation: Fire Ecology 2014 10:10030063

    Content type: Research Article

    Published on:

  18. Post-fire mulch and seeding treatments, often applied on steep, severely burned slopes immediately after large wildfires, are meant to reduce the potential of erosion and establishment of invasive plants, espe...

    Authors: Penelope Morgan, Marshell Moy, Christine A. Droske, Leigh B. Lentile, Sarah A. Lewis, Peter R. Robichaud and Andrew T. Hudak

    Citation: Fire Ecology 2014 10:10030049

    Content type: Research Article

    Published on:

  19. Student fire groups, collegiate-level groups explicitly organized around topics related to wildland fire, are widespread across the country. Student fire groups are at times participants in wildland fire-orien...

    Authors: Daniel S. Godwin and Jena Ferrarese

    Citation: Fire Ecology 2014 10:10020092

    Content type: Forum Article: Issues, Management, Policy, and Opinions

    Published on:

  20. While fire and rangeland managers frequently have different land management roles and objectives, their data needs with regards to herbaceous biomass (fuel loads and forage) often overlap, and can be served wi...

    Authors: Edward C. Rhodes, Doug R. Tolleson, Jay P. Angerer, John A. Kava, Judith Dyess and Tessa Nicolet

    Citation: Fire Ecology 2014 10:10020076

    Content type: Research Article

    Published on:

  21. The specific temporal patterns of antecedent conditions associated with fire occurrence in the Great Basin and Upper Colorado River Basin are poorly understood. Using 25 years of combined fire and climate data...

    Authors: James D. Arnold, Simon C. Brewer and Philip E. Dennison

    Citation: Fire Ecology 2014 10:10020064

    Content type: Research Article

    Published on:

  22. Understanding the distribution of fire severity patches across a landscape is of critical importance to managers and researchers. Of particular interest are those areas that burn multiple times. Understanding ...

    Authors: Valentijn Hoff, Casey C. Teske, James P. Riddering, Lloyd P. Queen, Eric G. Gdula and Windy A. Bunn

    Citation: Fire Ecology 2014 10:10020048

    Content type: Research Article

    Published on:

  23. In semi-arid grasslands of the North American Great Plains, fire has traditionally been viewed as having few management applications, and quantitative measurements of fire behavior in the low fuel loads charac...

    Authors: David J. Augustine, Justin D. Derner and David P. Smith

    Citation: Fire Ecology 2014 10:10020036

    Content type: Research Article

    Published on:

  24. The mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins; MPB) has killed lodgepole pines (Pinus contorta Dougl. ex Loud.) across 20 million hectares of central British Columbia, Canada, since the late 1990s, ch...

    Authors: Daniel D. B. Perrakis, Rick A. Lanoville, Stephen W. Taylor and Dana Hicks

    Citation: Fire Ecology 2014 10:10020010

    Content type: Research Article

    Published on:

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